Melinda Keys

Melinda Keys, Australia
Full-Time MBA Class of 2023

LinkedIn

Professional Roles, Achievements and Activities

Achievements

  • Mining professional with 7 years of experience at two of the world’s biggest miners, BHP & FMG. Worked as a Geologist, Operations Supervisor, and Project Manager
  • Recipient of Forte Fellowship
  • TedX Speaker on Women in Leadership

Activities

  • VP of Operations & Supply Chain Club
  • Upcoming internship with Boston Consulting Group
  • Frequent keynote speaker at mining events
  • Advocate for inclusion & diversity in the workplace (particularly in the resources sector)
  • Mentor to young women in mining
  • Work with educational sector (primary, secondary, and tertiary) to encourage more students into STEM fields
  • Mental Health First Aider

Academics

  • MBA Batch of 2023, top 3% of cohort
  • Upcoming exchange at Kellogg Business School, Northwestern University, Chicago
  • Bachelor of Science, The University of Melbourne
  • Master of Science, The University of Melbourne

What is invisible but essential about YOU? or ESADE? or Barcelona?

What’s essential about me is that I am passionate about Inclusion & Diversity and mental health, particularly in the workplace.

With 2 science degrees (Bachelors and Masters), I am a scientist by training and a mining professional. My interest in geology and the resources industry comes from the very practical application of scientific practice and thought.

What is not widely known is that the mining industry in Australia continues to be male-dominated, with only 18% of the workforce being women. Furthermore, people who work in the mining industry in Australia suffer much worse levels of poor mental health, exhibited through the fact that mining professionals are 80% more likely to die from suicide.

These two core issues have spurred me into action in the workplace, and I am motivated to work each day in the mining industry to make it a better place than where I found it, both as a professional and as a leader.

On a personal level, I have experienced gender-based discrimination, misogynist attitudes, and sexual harassment on the job. When I was hired for my first position, my peers often asked (“jokingly”, I was told) if I was hired as a receptionist. Even with two geology degrees, many people assumed I worked in administration, rather than as a geologist. I have frequently been the only woman in production meetings, and have also experienced the gender pay gap firsthand.

In reaction to these experiences, I have strived to build an inclusive workplace by mentoring young women in mining. Along with campaigning for female specific work uniforms (Personal Protective Equipment) and speaking up about sexual harassment and assault in the workplace, I make it a point to promote a ‘safe to speak up’ culture in my teams so that I can develop all team members to achieve their career goals.

Like anyone, my mental health goes up and down, and is particularly at risk if I am stressed, fatigued, or when there are external factors outside of my control (such as work or family situations). As such, I ensure to keep on top of my mental health by seeing a psychologist when I need. I view this as very normal (after all, you go and see a doctor when you have a cold, why wouldn’t you see a psychologist when you’re feeling down?), but unfortunately, I feel this is still incredibly stigmatized. When I became a people leader for the first time, I made sure to get my Mental Health First Aid, so that I could respond appropriately to mental health crisis situations, and also be a better supervisor. I also speak up about my own mental health journey to reduce the stigma.

The promotion of I&D and mental health is a core of who I am. It’s turning into my life’s passion, and I can’t imagine having a career without having a component of this advocacy work. Perhaps it’s not particularly invisible about me, as I am vocal and unapologetic about it, but it’s of vital importance yet still invisible to some, as we don’t talk about it enough.

Mollie Moric

Mollie Moric, Canada
Full-Time MBA Class of 2023
LinkedIn

Professional Roles, Achievements and Activities

Achievements

  • Sales and Marketing Professional with 5+ years of experience
  • Recipient of Forte Fellowship for Women
  • Student Fellow for APAC Region
  • Keynote Speaker to audience of 150+ on working effectively in cross-cultural teams
  • Women in Business Board Member at Chamber of Commerce in Taipei
  • Featured in Business Class Magazine

Activities

  • VP of Marketing for Esade Tech Club
  • Touring cyclist (Cycled 1000km in 9 days)
  • Traveling (Traveled to 25+ countries)

Academics

  • MBA Batch of 2023
  • University of Victoria, B.A. Commerce 2016

What is invisible but essential about YOU? or ESADE? or Barcelona?

What’s essential about me is that I have an aptitude for risk, and this has enabled me to authentically develop myself as a global professional.

People may be surprised to learn that not only was I offered a job on a two-hour plane ride, but that I accepted the position and relocated from Canada to England for the role.

As I smiled at passengers shuffling into their seats on a plane ride from London to Austria in 2016, I would never have guessed that a few hours later, one of those strangers would be my future boss.

Most people call me an extrovert. I’ve always found it easy to strike up conversations with people I meet. Naturally, I fell into a discussion about the eCommerce industry with the man who sat next to me on the plane. As a Bachelor of Commerce student close to graduation, I was delighted to have the opportunity to ask an expert about the booming industry.

After entertaining my questions, the man revealed he was the managing director of the company we had discussed. As the plane ride ended, he handed me a business card, said he liked my enthusiasm and asked if I would consider relocating.

A few months and virtual interviews later, I started my 6-month internship at a cross-border eCommerce solutions company in London run by the man on the plane.

And that is only the beginning—my next step was to move to Taiwan to work for 4 years. What most people don’t know is that I moved without having visited Asia before, and without having a job lined up.  

Like my move to London, I let myself jump into the unknown because I knew I would learn more about myself through immersing myself in a different culture.

Taiwan is incredibly different from London or Canada. There were very few other foreign female professionals in Taiwan — especially under the age of 30 like me. Although incredibly rewarding, it could be a challenging new environment to navigate at times.

But along with the challenges, I learned to be completely comfortable in my own skin. I felt that by pushing my boundaries yet again and succeeding, I found a new level of confidence and developed valuable skills, like communicating beyond language barriers.

Even in a professional context, I was exposed to different working styles, and learned how to work with people from all around the world.

I am grateful for my unique international career and can’t wait to see where I will be after the ESADE MBA.